The Observationist

51,755 notes

youwatchme:

For the callback they made me learn ‘Defying Gravity’. I was doing really well, then I totally cracked on the high, high note at the end. I screamed ‘F***!’ at the top of my lungs. Then, without the piano player, I sang the note again to show that I could actually hit it and I kept going. (Director) Joe says that’s what got me the role. He could see that I was able to play a witch.   - Idina Menzel

youwatchme:

For the callback they made me learn ‘Defying Gravity’. I was doing really well, then I totally cracked on the high, high note at the end. I screamed ‘F***!’ at the top of my lungs. Then, without the piano player, I sang the note again to show that I could actually hit it and I kept going. (Director) Joe says that’s what got me the role. He could see that I was able to play a witch.   - Idina Menzel

(via thehalfmadwriter)

43,786 notes

bramblepatch:

justjasper:

there had to be slytherin students who didn’t go with the rest of the house and fought in the battle for hogwarts

kids who took off their ties so nobody could clock them, who blended in with the forces

kids who kept their ties on and realised it would be a lonely fight

kids who watched as the other houses recognised them, and stood in silent solidarity with them,

kids who hated slytherin house, but knew anyone who stayed was their ally

a group of school children are not a lost cause, are not rotten to the core, even if they’ve been raised on some poisonous shit. it’s a shame they were treated like they were irredeemable by the canon narrative

And then there also had to be the ones who evacuated with the younger students, looking over their shoulders in case of pursuit, wands in hand and hexes on their tongues.

Who counted heads and made sure, with the memory for faces and names that makes for a budding politician, that the youngest students were there - not only their own house, but the preteens in yellow and blue and red, too.

Who saw a third year about to sneak off to join the battle and stunned him and carried him out to safety, lying through their teeth - he fell and hit his head in the rush, someone make sure he’s ok - because tonight of all nights no one is going to buy that that attack was for the boy’s own good.

Who, when confronted with a girl in a red and gold scarf who is four months short of her seventeenth birthday and full of fire and steel, demanding why they’re here, why they’re hiding like cowards, why they aren’t fighting, could look down their nose at the bloodthirsty little fool and inform her that people will die tonight, good brave, loyal, intelligent people, but people will live tonight, too. And some of those people will be the generation of young students smuggled out of the castle, who we have seen get away safe, no thanks to your lust for battle. And some of those will be the veterans who limp away as the dust clears, and they will need succor - can you brew a bone knitting potion with the contents of your school bag over a tea light? Because I can. And the world will continue to turn and no matter how important the battle that is raging, the wizarding world is bigger than one castle and wizarding society is more than one institution.

Because cunning is not cowardice, and ambition is not a sin, and some day someone in this milling crowd of scared children will sit on the Wizengamot and someone will invent a startlingly effective magical treatment for a common illness and someone will create renowned works of art and it will, in part, be because I helped make sure they were safely clear of Hogwarts before the castle started falling down around our ears.

(via stilinskisexual)

199,661 notes

726,311 Plays
Augustus's Letter

hislovelysummergirl:

jamesgwilymherondale:

totheperfectspace:

lightgetsout:

A fan narration of Augustus Waters’s letter to Peter Van Houten.

I INSTANTLY GASPED BECAUSE IT’S AUGUSTUS. IT’S REALLY HIM

I tried hard not to reblog this, when it first started I was not at all taken with it. But the longer you listen, the more softened his voice becomes, the more real it feels. By the time he is talking about holding her hand I was in tears. It was Gus, it was him speaking and it just hurt so bad that now I am sitting here in tears wondering what notes he had written for Hazel’s eulogy.

This is why I love fanart so much, in all its varying forms. Seeing people understand and portray the characters so brilliantly takes my breath away. This is wonderful- guaranteed to make you cry if you loved Augustus like I did. A lovely performance. 

(via ofquietthoughtsandbattlecries)

102,631 notes

It saddens me to see girls proudly declaring they’re not like other girls – especially when it’s 41,000 girls saying it in a chorus, never recognizing the contradiction. It’s taking a form of contempt for women – even a hatred for women – and internalizing it by saying, Yes, those girls are awful, but I’m special, I’m not like that, instead of stepping back and saying, This is a lie.

The real meaning of “I’m not like the other girls” is, I think, “I’m not the media’s image of what girls should be.” Well, very, very few of us are. Pop culture wants to tell us that we’re all shallow, backstabbing, appearance-obsessed shopaholics without a thought in our heads beyond cute boys and cuter handbags. It’s a lie – a flat-out lie – and we need to recognize it and say so instead of accepting that judgment as true for other girls, but not for you.
“I’m not like the other girls”, Claudia Gray   (via elisabethofyork)

(Source: birdwithapeopleface, via ofquietthoughtsandbattlecries)

82,867 notes

"When I was about 20 years old, I met an old pastor’s wife who told me that when she was young and had her first child, she didn’t believe in striking children, although spanking kids with a switch pulled from a tree was standard punishment at the time. But one day, when her son was four or five, he did something that she felt warranted a spanking–the first in his life. She told him that he would have to go outside himself and find a switch for her to hit him with.

The boy was gone a long time. And when he came back in, he was crying. He said to her, “Mama, I couldn’t find a switch, but here’s a rock that you can throw at me.”

All of a sudden the mother understood how the situation felt from the child’s point of view: that if my mother wants to hurt me, then it makes no difference what she does it with; she might as well do it with a stone.

And the mother took the boy into her lap and they both cried. Then she laid the rock on a shelf in the kitchen to remind herself forever: never violence. And that is something I think everyone should keep in mind. Because if violence begins in the nursery one can raise children into violence.”

Astrid Lindgren, author of Pippi Longstocking, 1978 Peace Prize Acceptance Speech  (via theytookmyluna)

(Source: jillymomcraftypants, via ofquietthoughtsandbattlecries)